Events

Thursday, September 19th 2013

First event of the semester! What is Bioethics?

Interested in the controversial topics brought up by advances in science and medicine? Just curious about what we are talking about? Taking an intro to bioethics course and want to learn more? Come to HUBS’ first event of the semester where Ishan Dasgupta, from the Berman Institute of Bioethics, will address what bioethics is. Pizza provided and all are welcome!

Thursday, May 2nd 2013

Last Event of the Semester: Controversies in Reproduction

We are excited to have Dr. Barry Zirkin from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health!

Join us and discuss current issues and developments in reproduction.

Professor Zirkin will be discussing topics such as in vitro fertilization, sperm injections, cloning, stem cells, hormone replacement, contraception, and abortion. We will discuss questions such as who owns a fertilized embryo when a couple splits? What happens to a frozen embryo? Should we throw embryos out? Who should be allowed to make a baby?

Come with your own questions or just to hear those of others and learn about a very interesting and important current issue in medical and research ethics. Little or no prior understanding of stem cells is necessary as we will begin with a brief overview of them, so everyone is welcome!

Pre-registration is open and encouraged.
http://tinyurl.com/HUBSReproductionEvent

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

Mock IRB: You be the judge!

What are the key ethical issues raised by this study?
What are the risks and benefits of study participation that should be listed in the consent form? Are these fair?
Should the IRB approve the study as it is currently designed?
What level of care should be provided for study participants?

These are all questions that an Institutional Review Board must answer when deciding whether to approve a proposal for a clinical research trial.

Join HUBS and The Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics’ Dr. Dan O’Connor, who will be leading a mock IRB panel on a topic within International Research Ethics. See the conversations that determine whether a research study is ethical and the certain considerations necessary to have an ethical research project.

Friday, April 5th, 2013

Debate: Should Cigarettes be Banned from the Homewood Campus?

Hopkins Kicks Butts, a campus student group, is petitioning to make the Homewood Campus “smoke-free”. Voting opens this Friday and runs through the weekend. Join HUBS for a debate. We hope to have some members from Hopkins Kicks Butts in attendane to explain their group’s campaign and assuage some confusions and concerns that have been circulating.

Our event: https://www.facebook.com/events/434075290016077/

The HKB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/131592237025579/?fref=ts

Thursday, November 29th, 2012

Who Should Live in a Pandemic Flu? You Decide!

A Pandemic flu has descended upon the world. We have limited resources and everyone is demanding the cure. You must decide: who lives and who dies?

Join the Hopkins Undergraduate Bioethics Society for a round table style discussion, open to anyone and everyone who is interested. Dinner will be provided, but is limited to the first 25 registrants. Register at this link below:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?fromEmail=true&formkey=dFFHOWhMQVlndjFKS09TMjRsc3BReXc6MQ

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Who Has a Better Vision for Health Care? Obama or Romney?

Come and join HUBS in a discussion about the future of health care and which presidential candidate presents the best platform for healthcare on Thursday, October 11th at 7 PM in the Charles Commons MPR. We’ll be discussing the potential effects, benefits, and disadvantages of both platforms in such a manner that people who are familiar with Health Care can discuss with people who aren’t! Ishan Dasgupta, research coordinator at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics will be presenting the topic for discussion. The event is open for everyone and there will be free pizza and soda!

Wednesday, April 11th, 2012

Research Ethics in the Developing World Symposium

Registration is now open and required.
Register at:
https://jhubioethics.wordpress.com/world-ethics-symposium-registration/

Refreshments at 6:45, event begins promptly at 7

Monday, April 9th, 2012

Transablism: The Need to Become Disabled

Please join us in welcoming our distinguished speaker, Dr. Dan O’Connor from the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. We will be discussing the bioethical issues surrounding transablism and extreme body modification as it relates to this issue.

This is a closed event for members of The Johns Hopkins University
Event begins promptly at 7:00 pm

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Discussions on Ethics of Stem Cell Research

As stem cell research and utilization continue to advance, ethical viewpoints surrounding these developments become more and more complex. Is Stem Cell Research Ethical? To what extent can we use embryos for research, if at all? Come to this discussion and voice your opinion.

Refreshments served at 6:45 pm
Event promptly begins at 7pm

Thursday, November 17th, 2011

HUBS Distinguished Speakers Event: Panel on Premedical Ethics

Are there specific ethical challenges that face premedical students? Are the next generation of medical students really ready for a future in medicine?

This panel will examine some of these questions and issues in premedical culture such as medical professionalism, personal integrity and value that may pose some serious ethical problems for the future of medicine. Issues presented at this event will not only be useful for current applicants who will have to answer these questions during their interviews,

but also prospective applicants who will likely face these questions and issues in real life as well as on the newly reformed MCAT exam in 2015.Moderator:
Abbas Rattani, MBE – Research Coordinator at the Berman Institute of BioethicsPanelists:
Dr. Henry Sondheimer, MD – Senior Director of Student Affairs and Holistic Review at AAMC)
Dr. Milford Foxwell, MD – Associate Dean of Admissions at University of Maryland School of Medicine
Dr. David Verrier, PhD – Director of Office of Pre-Professional Advising at JHU
Scott Clark – Member of the Undergraduate Ethics BoardAnd featuring other special guests.

Other questions that will be discussed:

What are the principles and meaning behind the Institutional Action question on AMCAS and the ethical ramifications for the applicant?
How do medical schools approach the teaching of medical ethics and bioethics, both in the formal curriculum, in the clinic, in “hidden curriculum,” etc.
Do medical school admissions envision an outcome that will select students with higher moral integrity and/or knowledge of medical ethics?
Do you think that the pending changes in the MCAT for 2015, with content areas including ethics and philosophy, potentially have an impact on premedical education?

Refreshments from vendor will be served immediately following the event. Please come early for guaranteed seating.

Sponsored by:
Office of Pre-Professional Program and Advising
Berman Institute of Bioethics
Undergraduate Program in Public Health Studies
Department of Philosophy
Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program

With support from:
AED (Alpha Delta Epsilon)
IND (Iota Nu Delta)

Monday, November 14th, 2011

Health Policy and Ethics Symposium

In our collaborative efforts to provide undergraduate students with an outlet to develop their critical thinking skills, the Hopkins Undergraduate Bioethics Society and the Public Health Student Forum have teamed up to host a symposium on November 14, 2011 at 7:00pm. The event will be held in the Charles Commons ballroom. The first 36 delegates to register will participate in six roundtable discussions on various ethical issues within health policy (no prior knowledge is required). Seats are limited, and registration is required.

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Should Doctors Be Held to a Higher Moral Standard than Normal People?

Debate: Should doctors be held to a higher moral standard than normal people?

Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

Are doctors any different from their patients? Do doctors have a social standard they must live up to outside of the clinic? Should a doctor’s personal life be relegated? In a discussion led by the Hopkins Undergrad Bioethics Society, we will debate whether or not doctors have special moral obligations as representatives of healthcare. Come join us and share your thoughts!

11/1/11 7pm
Gilman 50

Tuesday, October 18th, 2011

Introduction to Neuroethics

Presented by Ishan Dasgupta
Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

What does it mean to be a person? What are we capable of today, and what will we be capable of tomorrow? In a short presentation hosted by the Hopkins Undergrad Bioethics Society, we will attempt to address these questions from an ethical, biological, and social perspective as we discuss the philosophical meaning of neuroscience. The presentation will be followed by a short Q and A.

10/18 7pm Gilman 50

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

Debate: Should performance enhancing drugs be allowed in the classroom?

This round table discussion will discuss the ethical issues in performance enhancing of a new kind. Is taking drugs to help you study better cheating? If parts of your brain were replaced with better synthetic material, are you still you? Come and partake in this debate and share your opinions on whether you think performance enhancing drugs should be or shouldn’t be allowed in the class room.

Moderators: Ishan Dasgupta and Abbas Rattani
10/4/2011
7PM in Gilman 5

Monday, September 19, 2011

HUBS Presents: Movie night showing: Limitless

Open to Everyone!

What if a pill could make you rich and powerful? A copywriter discovers a top-secret drug which bestows him with super human abilities.

Hopkins Undergraduate Bioethics Society presents a showing of Limitless, the 2011 bioethics film on neuroenhancement. Come for a movie themed night of popcorn eating, cola drinking, candy snacking, and movie watching.

Monday, September 19th
The movie will start at 7PM in Gilman 50.
Refreshments will be served.

Tuesday, 9/13/2011

Introduction to Bioethics

Abbas Rattani
7PM
Gilman Hall 50

A short presentation on what HUBS does, how you can get involved, and what bioethics really is.

Tuesday, 9/19/2011

Movie screening – Limitless
7PM
Gilman Hall 50

A showing of the 2011 bioethics film on neuro-enhancement. Come for a movie themed night of pop corning eating, cola drinking, candy snacking, and movie watching.

Tuesday, 10/4/2011

Debate: Should performance enhancing drugs be allowed in the class room?
7PM
Gilman Hall 50

This round table discussion will discuss the ethical issues in performance enhancing of a new kind. Is taking drugs to help you study better cheating? If parts of your brain were replaced with better synthetic material, are you still you? Come and partake in this debate.

Tuesday, 10/18/2011

Quick Talk:  Intro to Neuroethics
7PM
Gilman Hall 50

Ishan Dasgupta

A short presentation on the ethical issues emerging in neurology. What does it mean to be a person? What are we capable of today, and what will we be capable of tomorrow? These questions and more will be addressed. A Q&A will follow.

Tuesday, 11/1/2011

Debate:  Should doctors be held to a higher moral standard than normal people?
7PM
Gilman Hall 50

Are doctors any different from their patients? Do doctors have a social standard they must live up to outside of the clinic? Should a doctor’s personal life be relegated? Come participate in this discussion on what you think a doctor’s obligations are to society.

Hopkins Undergraduate Health Policy and Ethics Symposium
Monday, November 14 · 7:00pm – 8:00pm
Charles Commons Ballroom

n our collaborative efforts to provide undergraduate students with an outlet to develop their critical thinking skills, the Hopkins Undergraduate Bioethics Society and the Public Health Student Forum have teamed up to host a symposium on November 14, 2011 at 7:00pm. The event will be held in the Charles Commons ballroom. The first 36 delegates to register will participate in six roundtable discussions on various ethical issues within health policy (no prior knowledge is required). Seats are limited, and registration is required. Please read the HUBS Film Terms and Conditions as this event will be filmed. Food will be provided.

To register, go to http://jhubioethics.com/registration/

Topics will include:
1. Is the recent healthcare law ethical?
2. Should vaccination be compulsory?
3. Is healthcare a right?
4. Is euthanasia ever justifiable? If so, when?
5. If the government is providing welfare, does the government have a right to decide what people eat?
6. Is it justifiable to draft people into clinical trials?
7. In bioethics legal cases, who gets to decide what is right? Should it be decided by the public, or by religion? What gives a governing body the right to make healthcare decisions?
8. Who has the right to make decisions for mentally ill patients? At which point is someone mentally ill? At what point are you considered addicted?
9. How regulated should the drug market be? Can a competitive, profit-dependent drug market facilitate ethical research and commercial practices?

Hopkins Undergraduate Bioethics Society (HUBS)- Distinguished Speakers Event – Panel on Pre-Medical Ethics
Nov. 17th, 7:00 – 8:00PM Gilman 50

Abbas Rattani – Moderator

Are there specific ethical challenges that face premedical students? Are the next generation of medical students really ready for a future in medicine? This panel will examine some of the issues in premedical culture such as medical professionalism, personal integrity and value, that may pose some serious ethical problems for the future of medicine. Panel speakers included Dr. Henry Sondheimer (Senior Director of Student Affairs and Holistic Review at AAMC), Dr. David Verrier (Director of Office of Pre-Professional Advising at JHU), Scott Clark (Member of the Undergraduate Ethics Board), featuring Abbas Rattani (Research Coordinator at the Berman Institute of Bioethics) as moderator, with several potential special guests.

Feb 23, 2011, 7 pm – Lecture Series

Krieger 205

Who Will Be Counted?: A Closer Look at Stem Cells

Hilary Bok, Ph.D.

Speaker Biography: Hilary Bok, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Henry Luce Professor in Bioethics and Moral and Political Theory, received her B.A. from Princeton University and her Ph.D. from Harvard. She comes to Johns Hopkins from Pomona College. She has been the recipient of a Laurance S. Rockefeller fellowship. She is author of Freedom and Responsibility (1998), and several articles. Her areas of interest are ethics, bioethics, freedom of the will, and Kant.

Event Description: An in-depth look into whose cells get included in stem cell banks and who therapies will benefit.  Will people be left out due to race or ethnicity?

March 1, 2011, 7 pm – Discussion

Gilman Hall 381

Who Gets What?: A Discussion

Moderator: Ishan Dasgupta

Moderator Biography: Ishan earned his B.A., with honors, in philosophy and behavioral biology from Johns Hopkins University. During his undergraduate career he completed an honors thesis on the topic of the neuroscientific investigation of free will under the guidance of Hilary Bok. He was also selected to present his argument for cognitive enhancement at ASBH’s National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference. Ishan is currently Research Program Coordinator at the Berman Institute of Bioethics. His work experience includes being a research assistant at the Johns Hopkins Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Unit, a technician at an emergency room, and numerous volunteer positions in clinical settings.

Event Description: How should we determine who gets what and when? How does race or ethnicity contribute to current social understanding of resource allocation?

March 8, 2011, 7 pm – Lecture Series

Gilman Hall 50

Bioethics in the News: What is this Bioethics Stuff and Why Should I Care?

Alan Regenberg, M.Be.

Speaker Biography: Alan Regenberg is a senior staff member at the Berman Institute with active involvement in a wide range of research programs and initiatives. These include: The Bioethics Rapid Response Initiative; the Berman Institute Social Media Initiative; the Stem Cell Policy and Ethics (SCOPE) Program; the Program in Ethics and Brain Sciences (PEBS-Neuroethics); and the Hinxton Group an international consortium on stem cells, ethics and law. Alan’s research interests are diverse, and have recently focused on issues in global health, stem cell science and neuroethics. Alan completed his undergraduate training in History and Psychology at Rutgers University, and received his Master of Bioethics degree from the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania. Alan joined the Berman Institute in 2004. Prior to this, he was employed in multiple roles for an interdisciplinary, NIH-funded center researching depression in late life at the University of Pennsylvania.

Event Description: What is this bioethics stuff and why should I care? Alan Regenberg will use a selection of recent news stories to frame a discussion about the challenges and possibilities of broad public engagement in bioethics

March 29, 2011, 12:30pm – Special Lecture Series

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Wolfe W1020 (Becton Dickinson Auditorium)

Valerie Bonham, J.D.
Executive Director of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues

Speaker Biography: Valerie Bonham began serving as the Executive Director of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues on July 26, 2010. In her previous role as senior attorney in the NIH branch of the HHS General Counsel’s office, Val served as lead counsel for a variety of high priority NIH initiatives and was deeply involved in ensuring that federal scientific and biomedical programs were implemented and managed in a socially and ethically responsible manner. She has written widely on bioethical and healthcare issues, including the ethics of research in captive populations, issues of informed consent and research safety, drug review and approval processes, and conflict of interest matters.  She holds an undergraduate degree in ethics and the history of public policy and law from Rice University, a law degree from the University of Virginia, and is the recipient of numerous NIH Director’s Awards, Special Act Awards, and NIH Merit Awards.

March 29, 2011, 7 pm – Lecture Series

Gilman Hall 50

How Much Should We Spend on Health Care and Public Health

JP Leider, Ph.D. Candidate

Speaker Biography: JP is a doctoral student in Bioethics and Health Policy at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He received his Genetics, Cell Biology and Development B.S. and Philosophy B.A. from the University of Minnesota in 2008. His research interests include public health practice, public health systems research, and public health ethics. Additionally, social justice issues related to health, science and technology development, as well as pandemic preparedness, are of interest. For his dissertation, JP is examining the budget and priority setting process at state public health agencies.

Event Description: Financial Crisis. Budget Cuts. The Affordable Care Act. Will health care laws be a job killer in the US? What is the relative importance of public health and does reality line up with that perception?

April 5, 2011, 7 pm – Lecture Series

Krieger 205

Social Media and Bioethics

Dan O’Connor, Ph.D.

Speaker Biography: Dan O’Connor is a research scientist and faculty member at the Berman Institute of Bioethics and The Johns Hopkins Institute of the History of Medicine. He has a PhD in History and is a former Greenwall Postdoctoral Fellow in Bioethics and Health Policy. Dan’s interests are Social Media in Healthcare, Online Social Networking, Apomediation, History of Ethics, Transsexuality, Transableism.

Event Description: The case of the tweeting kidney patient: What did St. George’s Hospital do when they found that their patient tweeted misinformed accounts of her surgery? Is it ethically acceptable for healthcare organization to monitor patients’ social media?

April 19, 2011, 7 pm – Lecture Series

Gilman 50

Access to Healthcare and Essential Medicines

Matt DeCamp, M.D., Ph.D.

Speaker Biography: Matt graduated from Purdue University with a degree in biochemistry. He then entered the Duke University Medical Scientist Training Program, where he completed his M.D. and Ph.D. in philosophy.  From 2008-2010 he was an internal medicine resident at the University of Michigan. Matt’s interests are intellectual property rights and global distributive justice and normative change theory and practice regarding a human right to health.

Event Description: Over a billion people are living on less than a dollar a day. How do we even begin to provide everyone with access to health care? Who pays for it?

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